Record-setting sprinter, ’68 Olympic activist Lee Evans dies

Lee Evans, the record-setting sprinter who wore a black beret in a sign of protest at the 1968 Olympics, has died

Evans became the first man to crack 44 seconds in the 400 meters, winning the gold medal at the Mexico City Games in 43.86. His victory came shortly after his teammates, Tommie Smith and John Carlos, were sent home from the Olympics for raising their fists on the medals stand.

In later interviews, Evans said an official warned him not do anything similar. He took a different approach, wearing a black beret to show support for the Black Panther Party and other civil rights organizations.

Like Smith and Carlos, Evans was a college star on the San Jose State “Speed City” teams. He was also a high-profile member of the Olympic Project for Human Rights, which called attention to racial inequality and oppression and spearheaded the protests at the 1968 games.

“His legacy of contributions to sports and the struggle for social justice is indelible and enduring,” tweeted Harry Edwards, the architect of the movement.

After running the 43.86, Evans anchored the U.S. 4×400 team to a world record of 2 minutes, 56.16 seconds. The 400 record stood for almost 20 years. The relay record stood for 24.

Evans won five U.S. titles at 400 meters and is a member of both the USATF and U.S. Olympic halls of fame.

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